HOLIDAY

Green Builder Media Releases Remodeling Field Report

The report offers a look at actual green remodeling projects, including all the lessons learned.

According to Green Builder Media, they push the needle forward on sustainable home remodeling with the publication of its brand-new Remodeling Field Report. With two major renovation projects wrapping up—one in Scottsdale, Ariz., the other in Austin, Texas—remodeling teams experienced the real-world surprises and setbacks that make rehabbing so challenging: labor shortages, permitting issues, unexpected water damage behind the walls, clients getting a divorce, and so on.

One of the resounding lessons learned from both projects is that homes built in the last 30 or 40 years as “luxury” projects often don’t pass muster when it comes to performance. Both whole-house renovations uncovered construction flaws and inferior products far less impressive than their facades.

“In the United States, the average home is 35 years old,” Green Builder CEO Sara Gutterman points out. “Nearly six of ten (58%) homes in this country were constructed before 1980—many of which have moisture, structural and durability problems; lead or asbestos; poor comfort, indoor air quality, and performance; and hefty energy bills.”

This report consolidates all the knowledge employed (and learned) in these builds and adds many other remodeling tips and caveats Green Builder editors have collected testing products, talking with trades and manufacturers, and generally staying on top of what’s been a supercharged year for remodeling.

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https://www.globenewswire.com/news-release/2022/01/19/2369578/0/en/Green-Builder-Media-Announces-Release-of-Remodeling-Field-Report.html

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